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St. Paul’s has tall order in Goliath project

By Meggie Hoegler
The Catholic Register

11/01/2017

The Biblical Archaeology Laboratory at St. Paul’s College, part of the University of Manitoba, is a partner with Bar-Ilan University in Tel Aviv in the excavation of the ancient city of Gath, the birthplace of the menacing giant from the David and Goliath story. Dr. Haskel Greenfield supervises his students at the ancient dig site. (Photo courtesy Tell es-Safi/Gath Project)

WINNIPEG (CCN) — For 21 years, students from St. Paul’s College have been helping to uncover the life of Goliath, one piece of ancient pottery at a time.

The Biblical Archaeology Laboratory at St. Paul’s College, part of the University of Manitoba, is a partner with Bar-Ilan University in Tel Aviv in the excavation of the ancient city of Gath, the birthplace of the menacing giant from the David and Goliath story.

St. Paul’s work at Tell es-Safi, Gath’s modern name, has been going on since 1996. Dr. Haskel Greenfield, a professor at St. Paul’s College and co-director of Early Bronze excavations at Tell es-Safi, has been on the project since its inception.

“We are interested in uncovering everyday objects that will give us an idea of what these people’s everyday lives looked like,” said Greenfield, who has brought over 100 students to Israel to help with excavation and research. His team’s focus is on objects from the Early Bronze Age, about 1,000 years before Goliath’s time.

The school’s participation in the project was inspired Christianity’s roots and its history in Israel.

“St. Paul’s is founded in the Jesuit tradition,” said Christopher Adams, director of St. Paul’s College. “We believe in serving others through being an active presence in the community. One of the ways in which we do that is through the archaeological excavation at Tell es-Safi. There is so much history between Christianity and Israel so it is important that we foster that relationship.”

St. Paul’s was founded by the Oblate Fathers in 1926 as the first English-speaking Catholic high school for boys in Manitoba. In 1936, it joined forces with St. Mary’s College for Women and later with the University of Manitoba. It is the largest Catholic post-secondary institution in the province.

“We actually found several pieces of pottery with the name ‘Goliath’ inscribed on the surface,” said Tiffany Okaluk, a graduate student and member of St. Paul’s College who has participated in the excavation for two years. “We don’t know if they belonged to the Goliath from the story or if it’s someone else entirely. It is possible that Goliath was as common a name as John for the Philistines.”

The excavation site is 10 km from the valley where David and Goliath’s battle supposedly took place. Universities in Israel, the United States and Australia have also helped to excavate Tell es-Safi. In 2014, archaeologists from Bar-Ilan University uncovered the Gates of Gath, which is referenced in the Book of Samuel when David flees from Saul.

“It’s fascinating to know that this could be the birthplace of Goliath, but it’s also a place where many other biblical stories took place. There is so much history here,” said Okaluk. “Being able to link biblical stories with archaeology is incredible.”

Greenfield says he cannot confirm that this is the site of Goliath’s birth without tangible evidence, which is hard to come by.

“We cannot judge the past by today’s standard,” said Sarah Richardson, a PhD student at the University of Manitoba who also participated in the excavation this past summer. “We can’t fact-check ancient history. But it is the common consensus within the archaeological community that this is Goliath’s birthplace. There are numerous other sites of ancient cities along the valley of Tell es-Safi that are mentioned in the story of Goliath so logically speaking it makes sense.”

Participation in the excavation is open to undergraduate, graduate and PhD students at St. Paul’s College. The students participate in the dig in the summer, uncovering artifacts and conducting field work, then spend the fall researching the objects back in the archaeology lab in Winnipeg.

 

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